Alicia Walf

About

Alicia Walf is a neuroscientist and educator at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute whose research interests are fueled by the broad question: Why are there individual differences in stress? This question led to studying hormones' actions for growth and plasticity in the brain and body. She has since refined her pursuit to include consideration of body, brain, and mind relationships as they relate to memory, perception, social cognition and emotions. Dr. Walf has taken a cross-species and cross-discipline approach in her work. Dr. Walf’s studies of effects and mechanisms of stress and well-being often occur in the “wild,” such as in architectural built environments, artistic installations, interactions with technology, contemplative practices, conference rooms, and classrooms. Her research inspires her classroom approaches. Dr. Walf incorporates contemplative, trauma-informed, and social justice pedagogy in her classrooms.

Education & Training

B.A. Psychology, East Asian Studies (State University of New York - Albany)

Ph.D. Behavioral Neuroscience (State University of New York - Albany)

Research

Alicia Walf's research interests are fueled by the broad question: Why are there individual differences in stress? This question led her to studying hormones' actions for growth and plasticity in the brain and body. She has since refined my pursuit to include consideration of body, brain, and mind relationships as they relate to memory, perception, social cognition and emotions. A current focus is to understand the contextual variables important for these effects of hormones for these behavioral and cognitive processes. Dr. Walf has taken a cross-species and cross-discipline approach. Similarities across species for stress and hormone effects are important to note as they suggest common mechanisms across mammals, likely including humans as well, in the brain and body responses to challenges. 


Estradiol has novel actions for brain and body growth:
     Dr. Walf has investigated the effects, brain regions, and receptor targets of estradiol across endogenous cycles over the adult rodent lifespan as well as effects of different dosing of estradiol or other estrogenic drugs for affective behavior (e.g. stress, anxiety, fear) in the hippocampus and amygdala (regions of the limbic system). These studies in animal models corroborated what was being found in the clinical literature; that is, variability in the effects of estradiol were due to many contextual variables, including, the individuals' age, previous hormonal and behavioral experiences, stress responsiveness, and health. Despite these promising findings, the growth effects of estradiol required further consideration.
     A major consideration in studying steroid hormones, like estradiol, is that they cannot be contained; that is, they move through the circulatory system and cellular membranes in the brain as well as the rest of the body with relative ease. The specificity of steroids' effects lies in where receptors are and how steroids can act on them. Because a basic function of steroids is to induce growth, there is potential for increasing growth in estradiol-sensitive body tissues, associated with reproductive cancers. Studies supported by a grant from the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program demonstrated that estradiol's functional effects in the hippocampus, but not proliferation in the body, involve ERbeta, a newly-discovered type of estrogen receptor. These studies also demonstrated that the mechanisms of estradiol for affect/emotions and memory in the hippocampus are not as distinct as previously argued and may involve novel hormone targets. Dr. Walf's research productivity and use of novel approaches in the field was recognized by her receiving a competitive and prestigious award, the inaugural Luciano Martini Prize for Young Investigators in Neuroendocrinology, named in honor of a trailblazer in the study of neurosteroids. 

Hormones' rapid effects to alter behavior and behaviors' rapid effects to alter hormones:
     Dr. Walf's work in hormone mechanisms relating to cognitive and emotional aspects of stress focus on the rapid effects of hormones through novel receptor and intracellular signaling targets in brain regions, such as the reward pathway and limbic system. These studies contribute to the field by showing that the effects of hormones for behavior are bidirectional, with hormones altering many behaviors (e.g. reproduction, learning, social interactions, stress) as well as these behaviors themselves changing hormones, such as neurosteroids (steroid hormones made in the brain), and thereby brain plasticity. This is a key finding relating to how hormones may alter brain and behavioral plasticity, and has continued to drive her research. 
Individual differences in response to stress and hormones in the context of brain and body health:
     Dr. Walf's overarching current research aim is elucidating the mechanisms of hormones in the brain as integrators of the internal and external environment as it relates to stress and well-being. These studies are currently being conducted using different approaches in human subjects. Her drive for pursuing the research goals on understanding described above is not only fueled by curiosity, but to provide hands-on training and mentoring of students in research of these clinically-relevant questions relating to hormones in the brain and body. Students are welcome to contact Dr. Walf about getting involved in these studies. 

Short descriptions of some current projects:
1) Studies on understanding well-being and mechanisms of contemplative practice within specific contexts are examples of current research investigating body and brain relationships as they are related to well-being and resiliency. For example, studies are ongoing about mindful/attentional practices for stress responding and higher cognitive processes, such as creativity. These are studies done to understand effects and mechanisms, but also to incorporate best practice in supporting growth, resiliency, and well-being in the classroom.

2) Another way to study hormones as integrators of the external and internal environment is to investigate these effects in collaboration with artists and architects. For example, Dr. Walf and collaborators investigate how artistic practice and performance and characteristics of built environments may alter cognitive performance and stress responses in human subjects.

3) To understand risk factors for age-related changes in emotional and cognitive function, in-person and web-based testing is being conducted. A novel risk factor being investigated is changes in sense of smell and whether olfactory training can be a potential prevention technique for Alzheimer's Disease and other neurodegenerative brain diseases. 
 

Primary Research Focus
stress, well-being, emotions, cognition, plasticity, brain health

Teaching

Dr. Walf's focus on engaging in behaviors that encourage growth is not limited to research endpoints, but also her teaching approach and the behaviors that she engages in to support growth in the various communities she is part of and can support. Dr. Walf is committed to training, mentorship, and educational outreach. She is driven to support a diverse and inclusive environment in the classroom and beyond to promote well-being and resiliency to stress. Dr. Walf incorporates contemplative, trauma-informed, and social justice pedagogy in her classrooms.

Current Courses

Behavioral Neuroscience This course is an introduction to the role of physiological mechanisms in behavioral processes. There will be detailed examination and discussion of the involvement of biological systems in feeding and drinking, sexual behavior, sleep and arousal, learning and memory, psychopathology and psychopharmacology.

Cognition and the Brain Perception and thought are considered in terms of processes represented in the brain. The localization and lateralization of function are examined, drawing upon research on the behavioral effects of brain damage as well as brain-imaging studies and other approaches. Examples of topics include object recognition, memory, language, emotion, spatial ability, and motor processes.

Hormones, Brain, and Behavior This course will examine hormone and brain/behavior relationships across the lifespan.  Hormones are molecules that are secreted by glands (the majority of which are located outside the brain) and have distal effects on their targets, such as the brain, throughout development.  A focus will be on hormones’ effects, mechanisms, and brain regions of interest for behavior and cognitive processes, such as perception, learning/memory, social cognition, motivation, and emotion.

Intergroup Dialogue: Imagined future/realities In this seminar course, students will learn to utilize the methods of Intergroup Dialogue (IGD) to explore their identities, interrogate their experiences, and communicate effectively across differences. IGD is a style of participatory education rooted in social justice that uses personal reflection and in-class activities to cultivate brave spaces for learning and self-discovery. By engaging with diverse texts and other media from various fields, students will learn to articulate bold visions of the future.

Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience This survey course is intended as an introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience. The topics covered will focus on exploring the neural underpinnings for cognitive processes, such as sensation, language, attention, motor control, executive functions, social communication, emotions, consciousness, and learning/memory. Basic aspects of nervous system function and neuroanatomy, brain development/evolution, structural and functional imaging techniques, and other research methods used in Cognitive Neuroscience will be discussed.

Introduction to Psychological Science This course embraces the science of psychology.  The aim is for students to learn how using the scientific method provides important insights about mind, brain, and behavior.  This course integrates research on neuroscience throughout all the standard topics in an introductory course in psychology.  The course presents advances across all subfields of psychology.  In addition to standard exams, there are online assignments for each chapter and online laboratory experiences.

Sensibilities “Sensibilities”—a special ART_X@Rensselaer (Art Across the Curriculum) seminar—draws from the tremendous resource of EMPAC to inspire students to cultivate writing skills through the cross-disciplinary theme of the senses/perception. During the semester students will have opportunities to observe unique art/science presentations and performances in an intimate setting at EMPAC, providing rich experiences for discussions and writing. Classes include reading science and art texts, as well as writing workshops to develop authorial voice and experimentation. 

Stress and the Brain This seminar course is a detailed examination of the mind-brain relationship, through study of the stress response. Stress is simply defined as any challenge to an individual’s homeostasis, or balance. This course will explore the neurobiological underpinnings of the stress response, with particular focus on how stressors can alter perception, affective and cognitive processing in the individual, which can in turn feedback to alter the general health of the individual (body and mind/brain). 

Understanding Empathy How do you know what you are feeling?  How do you know what others are feeling?  This course is an introduction to the emerging field of Social and Affective Neuroscience — one focused on understanding the brain mechanisms of emotions within and between individuals.  The course explores emotions and empathy from neuroscience and other fields within a historical, developmental, and sociocultural context.  Special attention will be paid to considering body and mind relationships and well-being.

Well-being: Creating a Toolbox Well-being can be defined as feeling sound in body and mind more often than not and generally judging life positively. However, well-being is different for everyone. In this class, students will learn about different approaches to well-being by analyzing scientific findings, incorporating experiential learning, and completing project-based assignments. The goal is for students to create their own well-being toolbox. Topics will include: stress, boredom, emotion, resilience, contemplative practices, creativity, consciousness, identity, and self-awareness.

Well-being: Cultivating Curiosity How do people maintain a sense of well-being in their lives? Each person’s path to well-being in body and mind is unique—arising from an awareness of our needs, goals and what each finds fulfilling. The theme of curiosity will be used to explore what makes people tick, what makes them feel balanced, stressed, or calm. This interdisciplinary course uses practice-based learning, in-class writing, lectures, creative play, and reading.

Advising & Mentoring
  • Psychological Science Program Coordinator
  • Pre-health Committee

Recognition

Awards & Honors

Teaching and Research Awards:

HASS Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award (2022)

Suzannah Bliss Tieman Junior Faculty Research Award (2012)

Luciano Martini Prize for Young Investigators in Neuroendocrinology (2009)

Teaching and Research Funding:

“Starving for Soc!al Interactions” The Burt Swersey Inventor’s Studio Challenge award from the Lemelson Foundation, Rensselaer Office of Undergraduate Education (2020; co-PIs A. Walf and A. Ma, students: Yue Chen, Chuizheng Kong, Tiffani Szeto)

“The Well-being Toolbox: Interactive Approaches with Complementary Use of Technology” Teaching and Learning Collaboratory Seed grant from the Rensselaer Office of Undergraduate Education (2019; co-PIs A. Walf and T. Hahn) 

“Atmospheric Delight” from SmartGeometry, an international Architecture group (2016; PIs: B. Matalucci & A. Walf)

“Stress levels in arctic dwelling mammals before, during, and after hibernation” University of Alaska at Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, INBRE program pilot project funding (2012; PI: A. Walf)

“Mechanisms of Estrogen and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators to Reduce Anxiety and Depression Behavior, without Proliferative Effects, in a Menopause Model,” from the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program (2006-2010; PI: A. Walf, Mentor: C.A. Frye)

Travel Awards:

Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students Poster Judge Travel Award (virtual; 2021)

Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students Poster Judge Travel Award (Indianapolis, IN; 2018)

Upstate New York Pharmacology Society of ASPET annual meeting- Young Investigator Award (Buffalo, NY; 2014)

University of Alaska at Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, INBRE travel award for Society for Neuroscience meeting (San Diego, CA; 2013)

University of Alaska at Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, INBRE travel award for Rapid Responses to Steroid Hormones meeting (Erie, PA; 2013)

University of Alaska at Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, INBRE travel award for University of Alaska Biomedical Research Conference (Anchorage, AK; 2013)

Parental Brain Conference Young Investigator Award (Edinburgh, Scotland; 2010)

Organization for the Study of Sex Differences Young Investigator Award (Toronto, Canada; 2009)

Steroids and the Nervous System Conference Travel Award (Turin, Italy; 2009)

International Behavioral Neuroscience Society Travel Award (Nassau, Bahamas; 2009)

Presentations & Appearances

Invited talks:

Walf, A.A. (2022). "Listening to Boredom" Vanier College Humanities Symposium, Montreal, Canada.

Frye CA & Walf AA.  (2018). “(Re)building healthy brains.”  N.E.U.R.O.N. Conference, Hamden, CT. 

Walf, A.A.  (2017).  “Sleep: What’s the point?”  ROTC invited lecture series, Rensselaer, Troy, NY.

Walf, A.A.  (2016).  “Hormones: from cell to cognition to conference room.”  Cognitive Science Lecture Series, Troy, NY.

Reid, L. & Walf, A.A.  (2016). “Theory on prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease.”  Cognitive Science Lecture Series, Troy, NY.

Matalucci, B., Phillips, K., & Walf, A.A.  (2016). “Atmospheric Delight.”  SmartGeometry conference, Gothenburg, Sweden. 

Walf, A.A.  (2016).  “Constructing cognition.”  SmartGeometry conference, Gothenburg, Sweden. 

Walf, A.A., Perez, O.L., Matalucci, B.  (2014).  “Cognitive processing of art, light, and space: views from neuroscience, engineering, and architecture.”  N.E.U.R.O.N. and Hunter College Psychology Convention, New York, NY.

Walf, A.A.  (2014).  “Differential effects of carcinogen exposure and chronic treatment with estrogens that act at estrogen receptor a or b for learning and memory among female rats.”  Upstate New York American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 3rd Annual Meeting, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. 

Walf, A.A.  & Frye, C.A.  (2013).  “Finasteride increases depression behavior, whereas administration of 3a-androstanediol reduces depression behavior and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor, without increasing prostate growth of male mice.”  Invited talk in Round Table Discussion of Post-Finasteride Syndrome, International Conference on Steroids and the Nervous System, 7th Meeting, Torino, Italy.

Walf, A.A. & Frye, C.A. (2013).  “Endogenous or exogenous steroid hormones enhance cognition and neuroplasticity among young adult and estropausal rats.”   Biomedical Research Conference, Annual Meeting, University of Alaska, Anchorage, AK.

Frye, C.A. and Walf, A.A. (2012).  “Steroids: therapeutics, challenge, and promise.”  Upstate New York American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Inaugural Annual Meeting, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

Frye, C.A., Koonce, C.J., Santarelli, A., Power, J.M., Torgersen, J., Walf, A.A.  (2012).  “Neurosteroids’ non-traditional mechanisms and sources.”  Institute of Artic Biology, Special INBRE lecture, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK.

Walf, A.A., Kohtz, A.S., Osborne, D.M., Paris, J.J., Frye, C.A. (2010).  “Impact of environmental stressors on autonomic, neuroendocrine, and affective responding in rats, mice, and people: Implications of epigenetics.”  N.E.U.R.O.N. and Hunter College Psychology Convention, New York, NY.

Walf, A.A., Paris, J.J., & Frye, C.A. (2010).  “Transition to reproductive senescence influences social behavior, cognitive performance, and anxiety-like behavior.”  Parental Brain Conference, Edinburgh, Scotland.

Walf, A.A.  (2009).  “Luciano Martini Prize for Young Investigators in Neuroendocrinology Lecture: The trophic effects of estradiol and SERMs in the hippocampus and peripheral tissues.”  International Conference on Steroids and the Nervous System, 5th Meeting, Torino, Italy.

Walf, A.A. & Frye, C.A.  (2009). “Estradiol’s actions through estrogen receptor β for functional effects in hippocampus-mediated behaviors, but not uterine proliferation or carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis.”  International Behavioral Neuroscience Society, 18th Annual Meeting, Nassau, Bahamas. 

Walf, A.A. & Frye, C.A.  (2009).  “Estrogen to female rats reduces anxiety behavior, but does not increase uterine proliferation or tumorigenesis, via actions at estrogen receptor β.”  Life Sciences Research Symposium, Albany, NY.

Walf, A.A., Rusconi, J.C., & Frye, C.A.  (2009). “Effects of estradiol and SERMs for anxiety and depression behavior and proliferation in the body of female rats.”  N.E.U.R.O.N. and Hunter College Psychology Convention, New York, NY.

Walf, A.A. & Frye, C.A. (2008). “Central, but not peripheral, trophic effects of estrogen, may be due in part to actions at estrogen receptor β.”  The Annual Congress of IDDST 2008, 6th Annual Meeting, Beijing, China.

Walf, A.A. & Frye, C.A. (2008).   “Mechanisms of estrogens’ trophic effects in the brain.”  Conversations on Hormones in the Capital District, University at Albany, Albany, NY.   

Recent poster presentations:

Walf, A.A. and Loveless, S. (2022) Stress is Reduced after Participation in an Online Deep Listening Workshop." Mind & Life Institute Summer Research Institute (virtual) conference.

Walf, A.A., Chen, C., Bartlett, C., Antonini, A., Hahn, T.  (2020).  The Well-being Toolbox: comparison of stress reduction techniques in the classroom.  International Behavioral Neuroscience Society (virtual) conference. 

Reid, L., Walf, A.A. (2020).  A Website for Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease.  International Behavioral Neuroscience Society (virtual) conference. 

Boardman, T., Walf, A.A.  (2019).  Comparing the Effects of Music and Creative Writing on State Anxiety.  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Ninth Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium. Troy, NY.  *won

Ahmed, I., Khan, A., Bala, P., Jue, M. D., Davuluri, S., Reid, L. D., Walf, A.A. Differences in Olfaction Influence Cognitive Function in Human Subjects  N.E.U.R.O.N. meeting.  Hamden CT.

Boardman, T., Walf, A.A.  (2019).  Effects of music and creative writing for state anxiety in adult subjects.  N.E.U.R.O.N. meeting.  Hamden CT.

Osei-Kusi, J. & Walf, A.A. (2018).  Role of carbon dioxide room levels for stress responding in human subjects.  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Ninth Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium. Troy, NY.

Taylor, D.Z., Moftah, M., Walf, A.A., Reid, L.D., Rutledge, E.  (2018). The physiology of cognitive processing and olfactory deficits among human subjects.  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Annual Undergraduate Research Summer Symposium.  Troy, NY. 

Taylor, D.Z., Moftah, M., Walf, A.A., Reid, L.D., (2018). Establishing a Relationship between Olfactory Deficits and Cognitive Processing among Human Subjects Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Ninth Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium. Troy, NY.

Taylor, D.Z., Moftah, M., Walf, A.A., Reid, L.D., Rutledge, E., (2018). The Physiology of Cognitive Processing and Olfactory Deficits among Human Subjects. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Undergraduate Research Summer Symposium.   Troy, NY.

Taylor, D.Z., Reid, L.D., Walf, A.A. (2018).  The effects of olfactory deficits on executive function among human subjects.  Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA.

Walf, A.A. & Hahn, T.  (2018).  Curiouser and curiouser: Contextualizing neuroscience in the arts and humanities to teach brain-body relationships to engineers, architects, and computer scientists.  Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA.

Walf, A.A., Taylor, D.Z., Reid, L.D.  (2018). Sex differences in olfaction and executive function among young adults.    Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA.

Taylor, D.Z., Reid, L.D., Walf, A.A. (2018).  The effects of olfactory deficits on executive function among human subjects.  N.E.U.R.O.N. meeting.  Hamden CT.

Taylor D.Z., Avens, F., Khan, A., Ahmed, I., Reid, L.D., Walf, A.A., (2017). Assessing a Connection between Olfaction and Cognition and its Relation to Alzheimer’s Disease. N.E.U.R.O.N. Conference, Quinnipiac University. North Haven, CT.

Publications

The following is a selection of recent publications in Scopus. Alicia Walf has 92 indexed publications in the subjects of Neuroscience, Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, and Medicine.

Larry D. Reid, Dylan Z. Taylor, Alicia A. Walf
Diagnosis and Management in Dementia: The Neuroscience of Dementia, Volume 1
, 2020
, pp.793-809
.
Sean C. Godar, Roberto Cadeddu, Gabriele Floris, Laura J. Mosher, Zhen Mi, David P. Jarmolowicz, Simona Scheggi, Alicia A. Walf, Carolyn J. Koonce, Cheryl A. Frye, Nancy A. Muma, Marco Bortolato
Biomolecules
, 9
, 2019
.
Amy S. Kohtz, Alicia A. Walf, Cheryl A. Frye
Physiology and Behavior
, 203
, 2019
, pp.113-119
.
Amy S. Kohtz, Alicia A. Walf, Cheryl A. Frye
Physiology and Behavior
, 203
, 2019
, pp.120-127
.
Larry D. Reid, Faith E. Avens, Alicia A. Walf
Behavioural Brain Research
, 334
, 2017
, pp.163-177
.
Berardo Matalucci, Kenton Phillips, Alicia A. Walf, Anna Dyson, Joshua Draper
International Journal of Architectural Computing
, 15
, 2017
, pp.54-69
.
P. Porcu, A. M. Barron, C. A. Frye, A. A. Walf, S. Y. Yang, X. Y. He, A. L. Morrow, G. C. Panzica, R. C. Melcangi
Journal of Neuroendocrinology
, 28
, 2016
, pp.1-19
.
Alicia A. Walf, Carolyn J. Koonce, Cheryl A. Frye
Behavioural Brain Research
, 294
, 2015
, pp.50-61
.

View All Scopus Publications

In the Media

Expert comments featured in Architect Magazine’s “Finding a path to Interpersonal and Interplanetary Connections at SmartGeometry 2016” http://www.architectmagazine.com/technology/smartgeometry-2016-a-path-to-interpersonal-and-interplanetary-connections_o

Featured article on RPI News “Rensselaer Experts Available to Discuss COVID-19 Pandemic” https://news.rpi.edu/content/2020/03/25/rensselaer-experts-available-discuss-covid-19-pandemic-and-effects-society-0

Featured article on RPI News “Rensselaer Releases Guide to Living and Working Well While Social Distancing” https://news.rpi.edu/content/2020/04/14/rensselaer-releases-guide-living-and-working-well-while-social-distancing Guide available here: https://everydaymatters.rpi.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/living-well-guide.pdf

Expert comments featured in elemental.medium.com “This is your Brain on Anger” https://elemental.medium.com/the-science-of-anger-28077f6799b5

Expert comments featured in livestrong.com “8 ways to keep the brain sharp with age” slideshow https://www.livestrong.com/slideshow/1011439-8-ways-keep-brain-sharp-age/

Expert comments featured in Reader’s Digest “Why Some People are Ticklish” https://www.readersdigest.ca/health/healthy-living/why-some-people-are-ticklish

Expert comments featured in forbes.com “Why Neuroscientists say, ‘Boredom is Good for your Brain’s Health’” https://www.forbes.com/sites/bryanrobinson/2020/09/02/why-neuroscientists-say-boredom-is-good-for-your-brains-health/?sh=18bd75491842

Expert comments featured in healthdigest.com “What’s really happening to your brain when you’re bored” https://www.healthdigest.com/288054/whats-really-happening-to-your-brain-when-youre-bored

Expert comments featured in “Cry it out” by Lisa Lombardi, Real Simple Mental Well-Being print only special issue (winter 2020)

Expert comments featured in today.com “Why it’s hard for us to fathom the COVID-19 death toll” https://www.today.com/health/why-it-s-hard-us-fathom-covid-19-death-toll-t191426

Expert comments featured in Reader’s Digest “The Real Reason you’re Attractive, According to Science” https://www.rd.com/article/heres-why-you-find-certain-people-attractive-according-to-science/

“One Last Thing: Managing Stress During Uncertain Times, Rensselaer Alumni Magazine (Winter 2021). https://magazine.rpi.edu/one-last-thing/managing-stress-during-uncertain-times

Expert comments featured in FastCompany.com “5 Ways to Boost your Focus Even For Short Periods of Time: https://www.fastcompany.com/90614039/5-ways-to-boost-your-focus-even-for-short-periods-of-time

Expert comments featured in Boston Globe’s “The Science Behind Why People Have Missed Traveling” https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/05/13/lifestyle/science-behind-why-people-have-missed-traveling/

Expert comments featured in AlternativeMedicine.com “Anxiety Managed Post-COVID-19” https://alternativemedicine.com/anxiety/anxiety-managed-post-covid-19/

Featured in: “Creating Inclusivity” Rensselaer Alumni Magazine (Fall 2021). https://magazine.rpi.edu/at-rensselaer/creating-inclusivity

Featured in “Tapping into the brain.” Rensselaer Alumni Magazine (Fall 2021). https://magazine.rpi.edu/feature/tapping-into-the-brain

Expert comments featured in Runner’s World “Bored on Your Long Run? As it turns out, Experts Say this Isn’t Such a Bad Thing” https://www.runnersworld.com/training/a38403426/bored-on-long-run/

Expert comments featured in AARP.org “25 Ways to Practice Self-Care” https://www.aarp.org/benefits-discounts/members-only-access/info-2021/25-ways-to-practice-self-care.html

Expert comments featured in FastCompany.com “5 Ways to Boost Your Focus, Even for Short Periods of Time” https://www.fastcompany.com/90614039/5-ways-to-boost-your-focus-even-for-short-periods-of-time

Expert comments featured in happify.com “Beat Boredom with these 3 Tips” https://www.happify.com/hd/beat-boredom-with-these-tips/

Expert comments featured in gulflive.com “Boredom Needs to Make a Comeback” https://www.gulflive.com/news/2021/10/cameron-smith-boredom-needs-to-make-a-comeback.html

Expert comments featured in Discovermagazine.com “When COVID-19 brain fog hit they turned to a language app” https://www.discovermagazine.com/mind/when-covid-19-brain-fog-hit-they-turned-to-a-language-app

Expert comments featured in Discovermagazine.com “Why do we experience FOMO”
www.discovermagazine.com/mind/why-do-we-experience-fomo

Expert comments featured in fortune.com “Stress, not laziness, is behind procrastination; here are 3 ways to retrain your brain” https://fortune.com/well/2022/08/03/stress-not-laziness-is-behind-procrastination-here-are-3-ways-to-retrain-your-brain/

Video & TV interviews:

Featured in professional video of “Atmospheric Delight” project at Smartgeometry 2016 (Gothenburg, Sweden) https://vimeo.com/162646118 

NewsPoint360 interview: “Boredom and Brain” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5xc5cwyBgs

WNYT interview with Benita Zahn which aired on evening news “Election Stress” (11/02/20) and included in Albany Times Union Health Beat (11/11/20) https://www.pressreader.com/usa/albany-times-union/20201111/282175063644218

Podcasts:

Brain Bytes Back podcast

Brain Plasticity: How technology, environments, and language change our brains” https://sociable.co/web/brain-plasticity-how-technology-environments-and-language-change-our-brains/

Rensselaer’s Why Not Change the World? Podcast Season 3, Episode 4 “Analyzing the Brain” https://news.rpi.edu/approach/2020/10/28 (Listen here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_FG5RInk-E)

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